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Thread: Chin splints

  1. #1
    Little Girl is offline Female Member
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    Chin splints

    Ever had them? What did you do to recover from it?
    The week before my last meet, I was feeling it was coming but I didn't know it was to do it at the meet! I was doing a 400lbs squat and on my way up I felt that my tibias were going to explode. The pain was horrible, I lost all my strenght and fell face first with the weight on my back... Wasn't pleasant to look!! Thanks to the spotters who save me! lol!

    I put some ice on it the following week but now, even after a month I still can feel it when I'm walking. Any suggestions?

    LG

  2. #2
    Squatman51's Avatar
    Squatman51 is offline Senior Member
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    A few people had shin splints last year on our football team and they just iced it everyday i believe. They really didnt get better until the season was over because all the running we did just agaitated it more.

  3. #3
    willlem is offline Junior Member
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    Arrow train them

    I had them a year ago when i started running long distances.
    I remember biting through the severe pain for 1 month when running. I also started to do calf raises etc. to build some muscle tissue and eventually it got away.
    My advice: Rest and train them at every leg session at the beginning of the training. (of course a little stack would help drammatically.)

  4. #4
    jbigdog69's Avatar
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    FOSAMAX, NOT CALCIUM, TREATS OSTEOPOROSIS

    Gabe Mirkin, M.D.

    You may have heard that a diet low in calcium-rich foods, such as dairy products, causes osteoporosis, but recent research shows that both high and low-protein diets may be even more important causes. Furthermore, a calcium-rich diet neither prevents (1) nor reverses osteoporosis enough to prevent bone fractures (1a). A recent report from the University of Connecticut shows that a low-protein diet can weaken bones by reducing absorption of calcium from your intestines (2). Several previous reports show that a high-protein diet weakens bones (3,4,5,6). When you take in more protein than your body needs, your liver breaks down the extra protein building blocks, called amino acids, into organic acids that acidify your bloodstream, causing your kidneys to neutralize the acidity by pushing calcium out through your kidneys. Drinking several carbonated beverages each day (7) and eating large amounts of salt may also leach calcium from bones (8).

    The drug, alendronate sold under the brand name Fosamax, can prevent and treat osteoporosis (9). Both major female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can be given at any age to strengthen bones with the combination far more effective than just estrogen (10). Adding bisphopshonate pills, such as alendronate and pamindronate, and a hormone nasal spray called calcitonin, strengthen bones even more (11,12). Exciting new research takes advantage of the observation that male hormones strengthen bones more than female hormones do. A readily available male-female hormone combination pill called Estratest strengthens bones in women. So does an anabolic male hormone called nandrolone (13). Diuretics also strengthen bones so they can be used to treat women who have both high blood pressure and osteoporosis (14).

    1) DJ Hosking, PD Ross, DE Thompson, RD Wasnich, M Mcclung, NH Bjarnason, P Ravn, G Cizza, M Daley, AJ Yates. Evidence that increased calcium intake does not prevent early postmenopausal bone loss. Clinical Therapeutics 20: 5 (SEP-OCT 1998):933-944.

    1a) Feskanich D et al. American Journal of Public Health June, 1997.

    2) JE Kerstetter, KO Obrien, KL Insogna. Dietary protein affects intestinal calcium absorption. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 68: 4(OCT 1998):859-865.

    3) NEJM 1994(June 23);330:1776-1781.

    4) American J of Clinical Nutrition 1994;59(Suppl):1238S-41S.

    5) SJ Whiting, DJ Anderson, SJ Weeks. Calciuric effects of protein and potassium bicarbonate but not of sodium chloride or phosphate can be detected acutely in adult women and men. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 65: 5(MAY 1997):1465-1472.

    6) R Itoh, N Nishiyama, Y Suyama. Dietary protein intake and urinary excretion of calcium: a cross-sectional study in a healthy Japanese population. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 67: 3(MAR 1998):438-444.

    7) G Wyshak, RE Frisch. Carbonated Beverages, Dietary Calcium, and Dietary Calcium/ Phosphorus Ratio, and Bone Fractures in Girls and Boys. Journal of Adolescent Health 1994(May);15(3):210-215.

    8) G Jones, T Beard, V Parameswaran, T Greenaway, R Vonwitt. A population-based study of the relationship between salt intake, bone resorption and bone mass. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 51: 8(AUG 1997):561-565.

    9) M Mcclung, B Clemmesen, A Daifotis, NL Gilchrist, J Eisman, RS Weinstein, GE Fuleihan, C Reda, AJ Yates, P Ravn. Alendronate prevents postmenopausal bone loss in women without osteoporosis - A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Annals of Internal Medicine 128: 4 (FEB 15 1998):253.

    10) Schneider DL, Barrett-Connor E, Morton DJ. Timing of postmenopausal estrogen for optimal bone mineral density. JAMA 1997(Feb 19);277(7):543-547.

    11) SL Greenspan, S Holland, L Maitlandramsey, M Poku, A Freeman, WY Yuan, U Kher, B Gertz. Alendronate stimulation of nocturnal parathyroid hormone secretion: A mechanism to explain the continued improvement in bone mineral density accompanying alendronate therapy. Proceedings of the Association of American Physicians. 108: 3 (MAY 1996):230-238.

    12) T Saarto, C Blomqvist, M Valimaki, P Makela, S Sarna, I Elomaa. Clodronate improves bone mineral density in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant antioestrogens. British Journal of Cancer 75: 4 (1997):602-605.

    13) L Flicker, JL Hopper, RG Larkins, M Lichtenstein, G Buirski, JD Wark. Nandrolone decanoate and intranasal calcitonin as therapy in established osteoporosis. Osteoporosis International 7: 1 (1997):29-35.

    14) D Feskanich, WC Willett, MJ Stampfer, GA Colditz. A prospective study of thiazide use and fractures in women. Osteoporosis International 7: 1 (1997):79-84

  5. #5
    Duck of Death's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Girl
    Ever had them? What did you do to recover from it?
    The week before my last meet, I was feeling it was coming but I didn't know it was to do it at the meet! I was doing a 400lbs squat and on my way up I felt that my tibias were going to explode. The pain was horrible, I lost all my strenght and fell face first with the weight on my back... Wasn't pleasant to look!! Thanks to the spotters who save me! lol!

    I put some ice on it the following week but now, even after a month I still can feel it when I'm walking. Any suggestions?

    LG

    If you are doing cardio and/or runiing, you might consider this:
    I used to run an awful lot and bought a pair of Puma running shoes. They felt great and I spent the next three weeks doing my daily five miles with them. One morning I awoke with bilateral shin splints which just about drove me nuts!! Aspirin, ibuprofen, icing, etc. were only partially successful. On a hunch, I ditched the Pumas and went to a pair of Adidas - guess what?? The splints were gone in five days!!
    MORAL: The type of shoes you wear make a TREMENDOUS difference in the development of shin splints!!

  6. #6
    willlem is offline Junior Member
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    Quote by Duck of Death

    MORAL: The type of shoes you wear make a TREMENDOUS difference in the development of shin splints!!

    That's right i forgot to mention it , I bought myself some special running shoes and it never got back while running with them so It Is True that shoes make a hell of a difference!

    Go to a specialised store.

  7. #7
    Little Girl is offline Female Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duck of Death
    MORAL: The type of shoes you wear make a TREMENDOUS difference in the development of shin splints!!
    I know, as a short girl (5' !!), I'm always wearing high heels or plateform shoes...(except when I'm lifting lol!). I think I shouldstick to my running shoes for a while..it will give a nice look with my short skirts!lol!

    but you made me think about it, ususally, the week before a meet, I always go to work with my running shoes on, that might be the problem... Thanks to pointed it!

    LG

  8. #8
    Bigkatz's Avatar
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    yeah the shoes make a big difference but a short female Marine showed me some stretching to do before and after workouts (cardoi and lifting).


    simply squat like a duck and move in circles keeping your feet flat on the floor. rotate clockwise and counterclockwise.

    this really hepled me overcome the splints

  9. #9
    Little Girl is offline Female Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigkatz
    yeah the shoes make a big difference but a short female Marine showed me some stretching to do before and after workouts (cardoi and lifting).


    simply squat like a duck and move in circles keeping your feet flat on the floor. rotate clockwise and counterclockwise.
    this really hepled me overcome the splints
    really??

  10. #10
    capone_22 is offline Junior Member
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    do dorsal raises. If you're like me, you'll never have shin splints again, as long as you do em.

  11. #11
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    never had a chin splint before, sounds painful, wouldnt be able to eat at all

  12. #12
    Little Girl is offline Female Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by capone_22
    do dorsal raises. If you're like me, you'll never have shin splints again, as long as you do em.
    Dorsal raire? Do you mean Lower back extension? Can't see the purpose... Could you explain, please?

    BTW, this week I started my holidays, (for 2 months) and I noticed that they are not sensitive anymore... A bit of rest helped me...

    LG

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by capone_22
    do dorsal raises. If you're like me, you'll never have shin splints again, as long as you do em.

    Yeah what do you mean by dorsal raises??? Also, what TYPE of running shoes are good?? I need to get me some good ones also. We dont have a specialized store here so the basic Champs, Foot Locker, etc. will have to do, amyways, any suggestions on good types of shoes???? Thanks!

  14. #14
    clampitt's Avatar
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    try reverse calf raises.

    they strengthen the anterior calf.


    if you have a weak body part, sure they are gonna hurt when you do exercises.



    www.abcbodybuilding.com .


    the ultimate guide to freaky big calves part 11.


    It is under ANATOMY and "bodyparts"

  15. #15
    phreezer's Avatar
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    a good Anti-inflamitory and hot/cold packs.

    RICE (Rest Ice Compresion Elevation). If you have access to a chiro with Ultra-Sound, you may consider making an oppointment

    Take care,

    Phreezer

  16. #16
    shaveem is offline New Member
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    had them bad once. One of my instructors told me to walk on my heels with my toes raised for 30 seconds,then walk normal for a minute. repeat 3 times. Did this three times a day and have had no furtheer problems. This looks a little funny but it worked like magic. good luck also maybe change of shoes would help.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by clampitt
    try reverse calf raises.
    These worked for me. I do them maybe 2 times a month now that the shin splints ahve gone away and I have absolutley no trouble with them.

  18. #18
    capone_22 is offline Junior Member
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    liitlegirl and sooner45: sorry for the late reply... Totally forgot about this thread, I never had the email alerts until i just activated it recently. Anyways, dorsi raises are what clampitt said. They are reverse calf raises which works the anterior part. Just sit on your heels and lifts your toes. For avery set I do for calves i do a set for the anterior. Works fine for me. Give it a shot.

  19. #19
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    FULLPROOF SOLUTION:

    1.First, make sure you only have shin splints and not a stress fracture. They can be symptomatically similar, but need different treatment.

    2.If they are splints, you must strengthen your dorsal flexors. Sit on a chair with your hands on the sides and feet slightly elevated off the floor. Spell the alphabet with your toes twice. After this, stand up and take short, slow steps on your heels with your toes pointing up. Do these exercises twice daily.

    3.Ice for 15-20 minutes twice per day


  20. #20
    Psychotron's Avatar
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    I agree with the shoes, I used to use New Balance, and i had terrible times running. Ive been with addidas for 2 years now, id reccomend the trail running shoes over the normal running shoes.

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