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  1. #1
    mitchellsandbur is offline New Member
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    Anything harmful about high dose BCAA's 2:1:1 and Beta Alanine?

    Just wondering if I am doing any harm here.

    Currently I take 60-75g of BCAA per day split between a shake in the morning, preworkout, during workout, after workout, and one at night


    I also take ~15g of Beta-Alinine split up the same way.

    Can't find any info about this being harmful so just wanted to check in here.

  2. #2
    David LoPan's Avatar
    David LoPan is online now Anabolic Member
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    Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) refers to three amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. You should be getting those in the meals that you are eating. I think there If you have a high protein diet then you are just wasting your money. Just did a fast search and here is the study and abstract posted by another member.

    Originally Posted by tarmyg View Post
    I have gotten anyone I help in the gym or otherwise off BCAA as I have found it to be useless. It would seem the scientific data supports my conclusion based on very few people.

    REF: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5568273/

    Abstract
    The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are leucine, valine and isoleucine. A multi-million dollar industry of nutritional supplements has grown around the concept that dietary supplements of BCAAs alone produce an anabolic response in humans driven by a stimulation of muscle protein synthesis. In this brief review the theoretical and empirical bases for that claim are discussed. Theoretically, the maximal stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in the post-absorptive state in response to BCAAs alone is the difference between muscle protein breakdown and muscle protein synthesis (about 30% greater than synthesis), because the other EAAs required for synthesis of new protein can only be derived from muscle protein breakdown. Realistically, a maximal increase in muscle protein synthesis of 30% is an over-estimate because the obligatory oxidation of EAAs can never be completely suppressed. An extensive search of the literature has revealed no studies in human subjects in which the response of muscle protein synthesis to orally-ingested BCAAs alone was quantified, and only two studies in which the effect of intravenously infused BCAAs alone was assessed. Both of these intravenous infusion studies found that BCAAs decreased muscle protein synthesis as well as protein breakdown, meaning a decrease in muscle protein turnover. The catabolic state in which the rate of muscle protein breakdown exceeded the rate of muscle protein synthesis persisted during BCAA infusion. We conclude that the claim that consumption of dietary BCAAs stimulates muscle protein synthesis or produces an anabolic response in human subjects is unwarranted.

    Conclusion
    A physiologically-significant increase in the rate of muscle protein synthesis requires adequate availability of all amino acid precursors. The source of EAAs for muscle protein synthesis in the post-absorptive state is the free intracellular pool. Intracellular free EAAs that are available for incorporation into protein are derived from muscle protein breakdown. Under normal conditions about 70% of EAAs released by muscle protein breakdown are reincorporated into muscle protein. The efficiency of reincorporation of EAAs from protein breakdown back into muscle protein can only be increased to a limited extent. For this fundamental reason, a dietary supplement of BCAAs alone cannot support an increased rate of muscle protein synthesis. The availability of the other EAAs will rapidly become rate limiting for accelerated protein synthesis. Consistent with this perspective, the few studies in human subjects have reported decreases, rather than increases, in muscle protein synthesis after intake of BCAAs. We conclude that dietary BCAA supplements alone do not promote muscle anabolism.

  3. #3
    MACKATTACK's Avatar
    MACKATTACK is online now EAT, TRAIN, REST
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    Get rid of the BCAA's..........waste of time.......

  4. #4
    HoldMyBeer is offline Associate Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MACKATTACK View Post
    Get rid of the BCAA's..........waste of time.......
    BCAAs are not as effective as protein, but they are still beneficial. I take a serving a day because I am cutting and it is 0 calories.
    That being said, Get rid of the BCAA's..........switch to whey

  5. #5
    mitchellsandbur is offline New Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by David LoPan View Post
    Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs) refers to three amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. You should be getting those in the meals that you are eating. I think there If you have a high protein diet then you are just wasting your money. Just did a fast search and here is the study and abstract posted by another member.

    Originally Posted by tarmyg View Post
    I have gotten anyone I help in the gym or otherwise off BCAA as I have found it to be useless. It would seem the scientific data supports my conclusion based on very few people.

    REF: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5568273/

    Abstract
    The branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are leucine, valine and isoleucine. A multi-million dollar industry of nutritional supplements has grown around the concept that dietary supplements of BCAAs alone produce an anabolic response in humans driven by a stimulation of muscle protein synthesis. In this brief review the theoretical and empirical bases for that claim are discussed. Theoretically, the maximal stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in the post-absorptive state in response to BCAAs alone is the difference between muscle protein breakdown and muscle protein synthesis (about 30% greater than synthesis), because the other EAAs required for synthesis of new protein can only be derived from muscle protein breakdown. Realistically, a maximal increase in muscle protein synthesis of 30% is an over-estimate because the obligatory oxidation of EAAs can never be completely suppressed. An extensive search of the literature has revealed no studies in human subjects in which the response of muscle protein synthesis to orally-ingested BCAAs alone was quantified, and only two studies in which the effect of intravenously infused BCAAs alone was assessed. Both of these intravenous infusion studies found that BCAAs decreased muscle protein synthesis as well as protein breakdown, meaning a decrease in muscle protein turnover. The catabolic state in which the rate of muscle protein breakdown exceeded the rate of muscle protein synthesis persisted during BCAA infusion. We conclude that the claim that consumption of dietary BCAAs stimulates muscle protein synthesis or produces an anabolic response in human subjects is unwarranted.

    Conclusion
    A physiologically-significant increase in the rate of muscle protein synthesis requires adequate availability of all amino acid precursors. The source of EAAs for muscle protein synthesis in the post-absorptive state is the free intracellular pool. Intracellular free EAAs that are available for incorporation into protein are derived from muscle protein breakdown. Under normal conditions about 70% of EAAs released by muscle protein breakdown are reincorporated into muscle protein. The efficiency of reincorporation of EAAs from protein breakdown back into muscle protein can only be increased to a limited extent. For this fundamental reason, a dietary supplement of BCAAs alone cannot support an increased rate of muscle protein synthesis. The availability of the other EAAs will rapidly become rate limiting for accelerated protein synthesis. Consistent with this perspective, the few studies in human subjects have reported decreases, rather than increases, in muscle protein synthesis after intake of BCAAs. We conclude that dietary BCAA supplements alone do not promote muscle anabolism.
    I've seen similar studies.... Those reports are based on consuming BCAAs without strenuous resistance training to elicit muscle damage / protein synthesis cycle.
    If you weight train like a man, the repurposing of proteins is not enough to fuel anabalism. Imagine if you had a house built of 5000 bricks, you can't make your house LARGER by reorganizing the same 5000 bricks. You need additional building materials.

    Anything I'm missing...?

  6. #6
    Charlie67's Avatar
    Charlie67 is online now Member
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    To each their own, but I too think.... Or hope... I'm getting my BCAA's from meat. But sometimes i get crazy any buy a bag BCAA powder anyway. I've never noticed a difference, but it's unlikely to hurt you, so do whatever you think is helping.

    I take Beta-Alinine only pre-workout (it's one of the main ingredients of many pre-workouts) I'm not sure how much 15g is, I only take 1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon pre-workout and that's enough to make my face tingle.

    More here:
    bodybuilding.com/content/your-expert-guide-to-beta-alanine.html

    Stop over-thinking, simplicity facilitate many things.

  7. #7
    Windex's Avatar
    Windex is online now Productive Member
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    I use Scivation Xtend products because I find it tastes exactly like juice. Prior to being active/fitness lifestyle, I use to drink alot of juice and sugary drinks. One BCAA drink a day keeps the cravings at bay. I don't buy into any of the mnarketing behind it, however' I'm more than willing to spend money on a product that might be beneficial based on its label and prevent me from wanting to drink junk (Not a fan of Crystal light style options anymore or Powerade/Gatorade Zero).

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