Results 1 to 24 of 24
Like Tree32Likes
  • 5 Post By GearHeaded
  • 1 Post By GearHeaded
  • 3 Post By GearHeaded
  • 3 Post By GearHeaded
  • 3 Post By GearHeaded
  • 1 Post By GearHeaded
  • 3 Post By GearHeaded
  • 1 Post By Obs
  • 1 Post By davimeireles
  • 3 Post By GearHeaded
  • 3 Post By kelkel
  • 1 Post By Wickedg8gt
  • 1 Post By GearHeaded
  • 1 Post By GearHeaded
  • 1 Post By Wickedg8gt
  • 1 Post By charger69

Thread: Training Principles Basics

  1. #1
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566

    Training Principles Basics

    here are some training principle basics that may help you guys out.. a lot of us are just meat head bros and we just walk into the gym randomly and crush whatever and hope for results (and being we are injecting enough juice we usually get the results), but I think training smarter and understanding the basics of some of these principles can lead to better more efficient results .


    Volume - most of us think of volume in relation to how long we workout and train a body part.. if your in the gym two hours doing chest your a high volume guy, and if your only doing chest for 20 mins your a low volume guy.
    that does not tell the whole truth though.
    volume can be calculated

    sets x reps x weight = total volume

    4 sets of bench press with 10 reps per set at 225 pounds = 9,000

    lets say that takes you 20 mins .

    well shit , what if I do
    4 sets of bench press with 12 reps per set at 275 pounds = 13,200

    I just did a ton more volume yet I did not spend more then 20 mins just like you.. more time in the gym does not equate to more volume. more total load moved in a single session is what makes for more volume.
    so just cause your pansy little ass spends two hours in the gym does not mean your a 'high volume' guy.

    so this is how volume is technically calculated. this is also how you can track "progressive overload" (I'll touch on this exact subject later on).
    if you want to progressively overload through out your training cycle, and easy way to track that overload is through the above calculation.
    if your total bench press volume in week one is 9,000 . then by week 5 your at 10,500. you've progressively overloaded . and it may not be just from adding weight to the bar . again its "sets" x "reps" x "load".
    if anyone of those goes up then its a progression in over load.



    ok so thats some of the more technical volume stuff.. but some of you guys don't like math or equations. so lets make this even more basic.
    volume is your total number of "working sets" per muscle group per session per week. a working set is a max effort set , meaning a set with the most amount of load you can functionally handle taken close to failure.
    if I can bench press 315 for reps to failure.. then sets of 135 and 225 are not going to count as working sets.
    only count your working sets.
    thats a very simple way to track your volume. if I do 12 total working sets for chest per week that is very easy to track and calculate and adjust. very easy to go down to 10 if need be or up to 14.
    thats a very easy bro way to track your volume. just keep in mind you need to have a clear distinction between whats a working set that you track and whats a non working set you don't track.

    so you see how it may not matter if your in the gym for 20 mins a time or 2 hours. its not 'time' that makes up for volume.
    if I do 20 working sets of chest per week, but only workout for 35 mins , I'm a high volume guy. if I do 6 sets of chest per week, but my workouts take me 2 hours , I'm a low volume guy. the duration of time does not equate to volume


    more principles coming up next...
    Last edited by GearHeaded; 12-09-2019 at 02:16 PM.

  2. #2
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    MEV and MRV

    minimum effective volume -- maximum recoverable volume

    MEV is the minimum amount of volume needed to maintain gains or slowly progress gains
    MRV is the maximum amount of volume that can be done and you can still recover and make gains and not digress

    if your below your MEV then your not going to provide enough volume stimulus to grow at all. if your above your MRV you'll eventually over train and possibly lose muscle , let alone gain it (yes studies have been done showing that too much volume results in muscle loss)

    you should be training between MEV and MRV. this is different for everyone. this is different for body parts and different for total systemic.
    your MEV for chest may be 5 sets per week, your MRV for chest may be 12. your MEV for calves may be 2 sets per week and your MRV may be 20.. then your total systemic MRV (all body parts combined) may be 60 sets per week. anything above that and your nervous system and body shuts down and digresses


    so these are the basic volume guidelines you should be keeping in mind.. you can also 'cycle' this volume guidelines within a certain training block.
    lets say your program is 8 weeks long. in week 1 you may be training at MEV , by week 8 your training at MRV. so for example your chest volume may be 5 sets at week 1 and 12 sets by week 8

    these are your very basic volume principles
    Chark likes this.

  3. #3
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    now that volume basics are laid down we can more precisely look at the details .. when you say you have 12 total sets per week for chest, what constitutes those actual 12 sets

    RIR = reps in reserve

    this is much easier to calculate for us bros then 'percentage of one rep max' . especially because most of us are bodybuilding focused and we don't have one rep max anyhow. an 85% of one rep max bench press for 5 reps doesn't mean shit to most of us (will leave that type of programing up to the power lifters).
    RIR is far easier to calculate. if you've been training for bodybuilding for any good length of time, you know what its like to train to failure. which is going with the heaviest load you can handle with good form for the most amount or reps possible until your physically can no longer do another rep.
    RIR is how many reps in reserve you have short of failure.

    if I bench 275 pounds for 12 reps and I could not get up the 13th rep, then I know 10 reps is my 2 RIR.. I can then calculate my volume loads and my programming of 'working sets' based on my RIRs and I can also use them to progressively overload.

    so lets say I program bench press. I'm going to do 3 non working sets and 2 working sets. during week 1 of my program my non working set RIRs may be 6 (ie, 6 reps short of failure) and my working set RIRs may be 3.
    the two sets that are the RIR of 3 are what I use to calculate my volume.. and over time I can progressively overload by simply changing the RIR. so lets say at week 4 of the program instead of 3 RIR I'm now at 2 RIR and then eventually 1 and eventually 0.

    then you can add another 'working set' to progress your volume loads. so instead of 2 set at RIR of 3 or less ,, you now have 3 working sets and maybe one of this is RIR 3 , one is RIR 2 and one is to complete failure


    this all my sound a little bit much or over thinking for a lot of you guys .. but keep in mind, guys that jump in the gym and train every single set and rep to failure over and over again , don't grow.

    you know how many 20 year little college boys jump on the bench press and put on 135 and do reps to failure as their warm up.. then they are at 175 to failure.. then 195 to failure. then after all these exhaustive sets to failure they think they can bench 225 and they try to get that to failure and their Buddy spotting them is basically doing bent over rows for 225.
    and this guys chest and shoulders are shit. he is not growing by taking every single set to failure over and over again.
    the first few sets should of been an RIR of like 6 . then when he got to the 225 he could actually benched it at an RIR of 1 and generated the correct amount of stimulus and load he needed to actually grow a chest.

  4. #4
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    bro split from flex magazine VS actual periodized training programming

    a bro split = Monday is chest day, Tuesday is leg day, weds is Arms etc.. do that for the rest of your life. your programing is based around a 7 day per week Gregorian calendar.


    a 'formal' program = days of the week mean nothing.. you don't just decide to train chest on Monday cause Monday is chest day.
    you have
    Micro cycles
    Meso cyles
    Macro cyces

    a Micro cycle is the short term training block. or 'training split' as some people refer to it as. but its based on programmed workouts for that phase, not based on days of the week.
    so lets just say your doing a basic 'push pull legs' program. and your splitting that up into compound focus days and isolation focused days with one totally separate arms day. so that means you have 7 total separate workouts to complete (a compound push day, pull day leg day ,, an isolation push day, pull day, leg day , and an arms day).
    those 7 workouts are what make up your MICRO CYCLE.. and you can progress from one micro cycle to another. your program could call for all your compound lifts in micro cycle number one to be at 4 RIR . then in micro cycle 2 it calls for 3 RIR.. then in micro cycle 8 it may call for 0 RIR and beyond failure sets.

    Meso cycle - thats made up of however many micro cycles your going to incorporate into a single training block.. so lets say your micro cycle is like the example above and is 7 workouts. you program and account for progressive overload in each of those micro cycles for the specific goal of hypertrophy and your going to do 8 of those micro cycles and then take a de load. that takes you say 10 weeks (but again the calendar doesn't matter) . simply completing 8 of those micro cycles is what constitutes the Meso cycle

    Macro cycle - this is more big picture and long term. this is planning out the accumulation of micro and meso cycles over time for a long term goal.. lets say your goal was to gain 50 pounds of muscle and get strong as Fk. well thats not going to happen in one micro or meso cycle. but you design and plan multiple micro and meso cycles for that long term goal.
    so meso cycle one could be to get fit and in shape, takes 10 weeks, meso cycle 2 could be to add as much muscle as possible, takes 12 weeks, meso cycle 3 is to get strong as you can, takes 8 weeks .. all of those cycles have their own individual micro cycles and progressions, but all of those combined over a length of time is what makes up the MACRO CYCLE .



    ^ just a little bit different way to think about programming compared to your traditional bro split and every Monday is International 'chest day'

  5. #5
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    Working sets

    I've used that term several times already. maybe I shouldn't assume everyone has an idea about the term. lots of guys go to the gym and push weights around and every set is an actual 'working set'. but thats not ideal.

    some guys may think this comes from HIT training or DC style training. but I think its more engrained in us then that and shows up in many training systems.
    you can't go into the gym and train for an hour like a little pussy with no intensity. you can't go into the gym and train for an hour with 100% intensity for 30 sets either. you have to pick and choose your battles. you have to be able to 'flip that switch' and turn on something in your brain and select the specific set your going to hit as your "working set".
    at some point your going to have to chose a set and its going to be a max effort set. and no you can't do that for every set during your hour long workout. people who say they are giving max effort every set yet train for an hour are likely training like little bitches and nothing they did was max effort.

    realize your have non working sets and working sets. yes the non working sets are important too. do not think you have to over do the amount of working sets.
    if you have 12 non working sets and 4 working sets in a workout , that may be perfect.

    pick and choose your battles wisely. the most bang for your buck.
    if you can bench press 315 for reps , well don't fucking blow your load and pre fatigue yourself doing a working set, amrap, with 185 for 25 reps.. thats silly. thats a waste of energy on a non mechanical tension loading exercise that won't provide near the stimulus your looking for muscle growth. hit 185 for only 5 reps and save your working set for the 315 for 8.

    I don't know how many reps I can get with 135 pounds.. maybe 40 or so idk. but guess what, every time I touch 135 when my programming is calling for 6 reps, I don't go over 6 reps.. why ? because the 135 is NOT my battle. I'm not wasting ammo on that shit. its a non working set. I'm saving my ammo for the 295 for 6, thats the working set.

    again, pick and chose your battles well . make your working sets a calculated decision
    Chark, Charlie67 and davimeireles like this.

  6. #6
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    Effective Reps

    don't remember who set it, maybe Ronnie Coleman, but its "I don't start counting reps until it starts hurting"

    for working sets those are the reps that matter. if you fail on bench press with 225 at 15 reps, then reps 13-16 are the 'effective reps' that matter. these are the reps the recruit the most amount of muscle fibers and provide the overload stimulus that provides growth.
    but again you can't do this on every set. you have to pick your battles.


    well "non working sets have no effective reps so why do them" ??

    heres an analogy for any of you that play golf .. why are you at the driving range hitting 150+ golf balls in a single session? you don't score. you do know that in an entire round of golf that lasts 4 hours you've probably only pulled your driver out and hit a golf ball maybe 12 times.. thats it. yet here you are at the driving range hitting 150 balls in a row with your driver.
    Those 12 driver hits on a golf course are what actually determine your score. they are the effective reps. BUT you know damn well the 150+ balls you hit on the driving range did help you hit the 12 balls on the golf course better

    your non working sets are just a tool to teach you how to make your working sets more effective and beneficial
    Rosco170 likes this.

  7. #7
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    just to add to the last point .. I will spend a ton of time benching 135 for only 6 reps. heck this is what my 120 pound wife does. why do I look like a pussy doing that when I'm much stronger. I leave my ego at the door , I'm not a timid little college boy that wants to rush to the bench press and rush to throw as much weight on as fast as possible to impress people.
    heck after 6 sets of 135 I may even start throwing on the belt, elbow sleeves and wrist wraps.. why? cause 135 is heavy? hell no its not heavy. I'm just doing things and practicing and rehearsing at the "driving range" to prepare myself for the working set of 295 for 6 reps thats coming up

  8. #8
    charger69's Avatar
    charger69 is online now Knowledgeable Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,908
    With all of these training basics, do you use a log?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    Quote Originally Posted by charger69 View Post
    With all of these training basics, do you use a log?

    I personally do NOT use a log but thats just cause of how my brain works.. I can tell you how may reps of bench press I did at what weight a year ago to this day. I don't need a log.. I know everything all the time. I can probably tell you when and where my wifes 3,270 orgasm was and what she thought about

    no log book for me but I think they are benefical for a lot of people

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    854
    Good stuff Gear.

    You should considering writing a short book, im sure plenty of people here would buy it

  11. #11
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    Quote Originally Posted by JuliusPleaser View Post
    Good stuff Gear.

    You should considering writing a short book, im sure plenty of people here would buy it
    the book on advanced AAS usage is already in the works and many guys here are already on the pre order list (I'm writing it now). but um yeah I kinda know what I'm talking about with training and nutrition too.

  12. #12
    Obs
    Obs is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    20,053
    Quote Originally Posted by GearHeaded View Post
    the book on advanced AAS usage is already in the works and many guys here are already on the pre order list (I'm writing it now). but um yeah I kinda know what I'm talking about with training and nutrition too.
    I came in here to argue with you!
    8P
    GearHeaded likes this.

  13. #13
    davimeireles's Avatar
    davimeireles is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Finding
    Posts
    1,005
    The best!!!

  14. #14
    davimeireles's Avatar
    davimeireles is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Finding
    Posts
    1,005
    Micro cycle is the phase of a training where volume and intensity increase in the first 3 weeks of training, making the 4th week a generative week for the musculature.
    GearHeaded likes this.

  15. #15
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    the way I program micro cycles , is that its basically your training split for the meso cycle with your volume and intensity progressions built into each cycle.

    lets say you basic training split is push pull legs. well your micro cycle is doing this split for a said number of workouts at a determined progression scheme.

    so for example - micro cycle 1

    workout 1 - chest, delts, triceps (heavy compound focused) - progression = all straight sets RIR of 3
    workout 2 - back, traps, rear delts, biceps (heavy compound focused) -progression = all straight sets RIR of 3
    workout 3 - quads, hams, calves (heavy compound focused) - progression = all straight sets RIR of 3

    workout 4 - chest, delts, triceps (isolation high rep focus) - progression = one drop set last set
    workout 5 - back, traps, rear delts, biceps (isolation high rep focus) - progression = one drop set last set
    workout 6 - quads, hams, calves (isolation high rep focus) - progression = one drop set last set

    ^ this is micro cycle one . when all 6 of these workouts have been completed you go on to micro cycle 2 , which will have the same training split, but just vary in the progressions

    micro cycle 2

    workout 1 - chest, delts, triceps (heavy compound focused) - progression = all straight sets RIR of 1
    workout 2 - back, traps, rear delts, biceps (heavy compound focused) -progression = all straight sets RIR of 1
    workout 3 - quads, hams, calves (heavy compound focused) - progression = all straight sets RIR of 1

    workout 4 - chest, delts, triceps (isolation high rep focus) - progression = double drop set last set
    workout 5 - back, traps, rear delts, biceps (isolation high rep focus) - progression = double drop set last set
    workout 6 - quads, hams, calves (isolation high rep focus) - progression = double drop set last set


    you'll see here that the intensity progression increased in micro cycle 2 by going to an RIR of 1 instead of 3, and the drop sets were a double drop set instead of a single .

    then you move on to micro cycle 3 .. same split only the progression in this micro cycle may be to add rest pause sets in place of your final RIR set . then add a triple drop set.
    then micro cycle 4 , this may be adding weight to the bar .

    you complete as many of these micro cycles to make up your meso cycle.. your last micro cycle is generally the most intense and what your progressions have been moving towards. after this final micro cycle you then take a de-load . and then come back and start a whole new meso cycle.
    a meso cycle generally consists of 4-12 micro cycles
    davimeireles, Rosco170 and Chark like this.

  16. #16
    kelkel's Avatar
    kelkel is online now HRT Specialist ~ AR-Platinum Elite-Hall of Famer ~ No Source Checks
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    East Coast Dungeon
    Posts
    28,909
    I've repeated it here for years but GH details it. Warm up for your compound lifts like a powerlifter. Minimal necessary reps to get to your working weight. Every BB'er here would benefit by spending 6 months training with powerlifters.
    Gallowmere, GearHeaded and Chark like this.
    -*- NO SOURCE CHECKS -*-

  17. #17
    Gallowmere's Avatar
    Gallowmere is online now Knowledgeable Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    2,037
    Quote Originally Posted by kelkel View Post
    I've repeated it here for years but GH details it. Warm up for your compound lifts like a powerlifter. Minimal necessary reps to get to your working weight. Every BB'er here would benefit by spending 6 months training with powerlifters.
    Quite right, and most powerlifters could benefit from spending a few months eating with bodybuilders. Each of the training disciplines is more alike than different, and wed all do well act like it. Hell, even on the drug side, PLs could learn a lot from bodybuilders instead of trying to stay as bloated as possible thinking that its helping.
    Test/tren /mast/halo will do more for weight restricted meet performance than all of the test/deca /dbol in the world.

  18. #18
    Wickedg8gt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    67
    Great read GH. I've learned alot since joining this forum. And I know while it's probably more effecient and better for overall gains to hit each muscle group twice a week i.e. push, pull, legs, off then repeat; let's say due to work and life, we maynot be able to do so. We can only go to the gym 3 or 4 days a week which is respctively enough time to hitbeach body part once. What are your thoughts on the "bro" training split and do you have write up on that? I'd love to learn more.
    GearHeaded likes this.

  19. #19
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    Quote Originally Posted by Wickedg8gt View Post
    Great read GH. I've learned alot since joining this forum. And I know while it's probably more effecient and better for overall gains to hit each muscle group twice a week i.e. push, pull, legs, off then repeat; let's say due to work and life, we maynot be able to do so. We can only go to the gym 3 or 4 days a week which is respctively enough time to hitbeach body part once. What are your thoughts on the "bro" training split and do you have write up on that? I'd love to learn more.
    I think bro splits have their place for sure.. they work great for guys with superior bodybuilding genetics, and they work great for guys that require lots of peripheral recovery, and they work great for maintenance phases.

    so let me explain why they work great for good genetics and guys that require lots of recovery per muscle group--

    someone who is genetically gifted and naturally extremely strong is going to put way more homeostatic stress on his body and the muscle he is training then the average person. and therefore he may actually need a whole week to recover that muscle group before training it again.
    heres an example-
    Bob - he is s genetic freak. when he trains chest he reps out 405 pounds on bench press no problem and he reps out 160 pound dumbbells.
    well thats a shit ton of load and homeostatic stress. he may only be able to train chest once per week.

    Average Joe - he genetics are average.. when he trains chest he may hit a max bench set of 225 for a couple reps. he uses 65 pound dumbbells. his loads are not that high, and his chest is going to recovered in just a couple days. and therefore he can train it again very soon.

    ^ see the difference . a lot of 300 pound pro's use bro splits. but they fall into Bobs situation. most us average guys will get better results with more frequency..

    now for maintenance.. bro splits work great. they stimulate just enough to help you keep your gains, but when only one body part is being worked out per week, they allow their joints time to heal and recover. so bro splits are great for maintenance phases and allowing for recovery.


    however, for your situation. only being able to workout 3-4 days per week. a traditional bro split is likely not going to work very well. you don't have enough workouts per week to cover a traditional bro split.
    I would do a multi body part split like this

    workout 1 - chest, front delts, biceps, quads
    workout 2 - back, rear delts, hamstring, calves
    rest
    workout 3 - accessory .. extra work on lats, traps, abs, side delts , etc..
    workout 4 - go back to workout 1

    or you could do an upper/lower split
    Wickedg8gt likes this.

  20. #20
    Wickedg8gt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by GearHeaded View Post
    I think bro splits have their place for sure.. they work great for guys with superior bodybuilding genetics, and they work great for guys that require lots of peripheral recovery, and they work great for maintenance phases.

    so let me explain why they work great for good genetics and guys that require lots of recovery per muscle group--

    someone who is genetically gifted and naturally extremely strong is going to put way more homeostatic stress on his body and the muscle he is training then the average person. and therefore he may actually need a whole week to recover that muscle group before training it again.
    heres an example-
    Bob - he is s genetic freak. when he trains chest he reps out 405 pounds on bench press no problem and he reps out 160 pound dumbbells.
    well thats a shit ton of load and homeostatic stress. he may only be able to train chest once per week.

    Average Joe - he genetics are average.. when he trains chest he may hit a max bench set of 225 for a couple reps. he uses 65 pound dumbbells. his loads are not that high, and his chest is going to recovered in just a couple days. and therefore he can train it again very soon.

    ^ see the difference . a lot of 300 pound pro's use bro splits. but they fall into Bobs situation. most us average guys will get better results with more frequency..

    now for maintenance.. bro splits work great. they stimulate just enough to help you keep your gains, but when only one body part is being worked out per week, they allow their joints time to heal and recover. so bro splits are great for maintenance phases and allowing for recovery.


    however, for your situation. only being able to workout 3-4 days per week. a traditional bro split is likely not going to work very well. you don't have enough workouts per week to cover a traditional bro split.
    I would do a multi body part split like this

    workout 1 - chest, front delts, biceps, quads
    workout 2 - back, rear delts, hamstring, calves
    rest
    workout 3 - accessory .. extra work on lats, traps, abs, side delts , etc..
    workout 4 - go back to workout 1

    or you could do an upper/lower split
    Ok. Awesome. Thanks for the explaination. Makes perfect sense. My usual workout looks like this; shoulder day, back day, chest day, leg day and then with legs or chest or back Ill throw in some bi and tri sets.

    I would love to get in 6 days a week and do p/p/l twice a week. But currently, I can only get in on Thursdays through Sunday.
    Last edited by Wickedg8gt; 12-25-2019 at 10:25 AM.

  21. #21
    Wickedg8gt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by GearHeaded View Post
    I think bro splits have their place for sure.. they work great for guys with superior bodybuilding genetics, and they work great for guys that require lots of peripheral recovery, and they work great for maintenance phases.

    so let me explain why they work great for good genetics and guys that require lots of recovery per muscle group--

    someone who is genetically gifted and naturally extremely strong is going to put way more homeostatic stress on his body and the muscle he is training then the average person. and therefore he may actually need a whole week to recover that muscle group before training it again.
    heres an example-
    Bob - he is s genetic freak. when he trains chest he reps out 405 pounds on bench press no problem and he reps out 160 pound dumbbells.
    well thats a shit ton of load and homeostatic stress. he may only be able to train chest once per week.

    Average Joe - he genetics are average.. when he trains chest he may hit a max bench set of 225 for a couple reps. he uses 65 pound dumbbells. his loads are not that high, and his chest is going to recovered in just a couple days. and therefore he can train it again very soon.

    ^ see the difference . a lot of 300 pound pro's use bro splits. but they fall into Bobs situation. most us average guys will get better results with more frequency..

    now for maintenance.. bro splits work great. they stimulate just enough to help you keep your gains, but when only one body part is being worked out per week, they allow their joints time to heal and recover. so bro splits are great for maintenance phases and allowing for recovery.


    however, for your situation. only being able to workout 3-4 days per week. a traditional bro split is likely not going to work very well. you don't have enough workouts per week to cover a traditional bro split.
    I would do a multi body part split like this

    workout 1 - chest, front delts, biceps, quads
    workout 2 - back, rear delts, hamstring, calves
    rest
    workout 3 - accessory .. extra work on lats, traps, abs, side delts , etc..
    workout 4 - go back to workout 1

    or you could do an upper/lower split
    So here's a good question that myself and others may want to know.

    Myself, I'm on my third week of my first cycle. I've had 5 pins. But for say myself or someone else looking to get on gear for the first time or maybe even a second time, do you feel it's a waste being on AAS when not being able to put 100% focus in the gym and being able to hit those 2 a week body parts or the extra attention in the gym one may need to do to be successful on gear? Say if one can only workout 3 or 4 days? Is it best to stay on something less anabolic like SARMS or PH?

  22. #22
    GearHeaded is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bragging to someone
    Posts
    8,566
    wither your on gear or off gear, you should do your best to optimize your diet, training, and recovery . BUT life happens. shit gets in the way. but do your best either way. life does not care wither your on gear or not. you have to do the best you can wither on or off. life isn't going to stop being a bitch just cause your on cycle . so just do the best you can wither on or off cycle.

    now gear is going to help 'band aide' some of your short comings and mistakes and allow you to get by with more. but this is not an excuse to slack off. but just because some shit hits the fan and gets in your way, doesn't mean you need to come off cycle either.
    just keep grinding away as best you can no matter your situation .

    when guys start blasting and cruising and are on gear year round , it basically becomes a way of life and a lifestyle. so you can up regulate hormones when you want and down regulate them on a whim.. if your on a heavy blast and life gets in the way for a few weeks, you can drop back to a cruise dose, then when you get back on track, start to blast again.
    Wickedg8gt likes this.

  23. #23
    Wickedg8gt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by GearHeaded View Post
    wither your on gear or off gear, you should do your best to optimize your diet, training, and recovery . BUT life happens. shit gets in the way. but do your best either way. life does not care wither your on gear or not. you have to do the best you can wither on or off. life isn't going to stop being a bitch just cause your on cycle . so just do the best you can wither on or off cycle.

    now gear is going to help 'band aide' some of your short comings and mistakes and allow you to get by with more. but this is not an excuse to slack off. but just because some shit hits the fan and gets in your way, doesn't mean you need to come off cycle either.
    just keep grinding away as best you can no matter your situation .

    when guys start blasting and cruising and are on gear year round , it basically becomes a way of life and a lifestyle. so you can up regulate hormones when you want and down regulate them on a whim.. if your on a heavy blast and life gets in the way for a few weeks, you can drop back to a cruise dose, then when you get back on track, start to blast again.
    Thank you. Perfect response. Couldn't have asked for a better answer. I'll keep grinding the best I can and stay on cycle for the next 9 weeks or so. Killing every workout and every body part I can. I'm almost 40 so you only live once. Lol. Thanks for your knowledge and letting me pick your brain.
    GearHeaded likes this.

  24. #24
    charger69's Avatar
    charger69 is online now Knowledgeable Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    6,908
    Quote Originally Posted by Wickedg8gt View Post
    Thank you. Perfect response. Couldn't have asked for a better answer. I'll keep grinding the best I can and stay on cycle for the next 9 weeks or so. Killing every workout and every body part I can. I'm almost 40 so you only live once. Lol. Thanks for your knowledge and letting me pick your brain.
    You are still a young whippersnapper.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Wickedg8gt likes this.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •